research groups

The following research groups conduct research at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, led by SAFL-affiliated faculty members.

Cavitation and Bubbly Flows
Exploring the dynamics and effects of cavitation from inception to super-cavitation and applications to improve devices and enhance human health.

Researcher:
Roger Arndt

 

Computational Hydrodynamics and Biofluids
Developing novel, fluid-structure interaction and computational fluid dynamics techniques to explore fluid flow challenges in energy, environment and health.

Researcher:
Fotis Sotiropoulos

 

Sedimentology
Exploring processes including river floods, delta formation, coastal storms, earthquakes and landslides to understand and predict change on the Earth-surface environment.

Researcher:
Chris Paola

 

Stormwater
Developing new treatment technologies, providing guidance for assessment and maintenance of treatment practices, investigating groundwater impacts from stormwater infiltration, and improving models for runoff and treatment practices.

Researcher:
John Gulliver

 

Turbulent Boundary Layers +
Exploring near-surface processes in the atmospheric boundary layer and in open channel flows. Focus areas are on the key physical mechanisms governing turbulent flows and their effects on renewable energies, particle turbulence interaction and sediment transport.

Researcher:
Michele Guala

 

Computational and Analytical Methods for Earth-Surface Dynamics
Research focuses on computational and analytical methods for Earth-surface dynamics with an emphasis on solving problems that involve free and moving boundary problems. Current activities include development of analytical solutions for moving boundary problems on the Earth’s surface; reduced complexity models of delta growth process with the ability to resolve channel dynamics and account for organic sedimentation; and analytical and computational methods for non-local sediment transport problems, including the development of finite element methods for solution of factional diffusion problems.

Researcher:
Vaughan Voller